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This is our page - our page to let you know what we dig, what we think is fun, awesome or just flat out WICKED  Plus, we have some feeds coming in from some of our favourite technology sources...so geek up folks!

 

100 GREAT Things About America | Happy 4th USA

 

It's time for a breather, America. Fire up the grill, ice down the drinks, and pop open that patio umbrella. Health care, the oil spill, Afghanistan, China, Elena Kagan and financial reform will all be waiting on Tuesday, July 6th. We promise. What won't be, though, is the chance to lean back and remember why we care enough about our country to spar over these things and in the end, remain united.

 

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Superyacht transforms into 'pleasure submarine''

 

From inside it looks like a swanky bachelor pad, kitted out with an abnormally large aquarium. But, this is no fashionable New York apartment, rather the latest in sub-aquatic luxury -- a cruise yacht that doubles up as a submarine.

 

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Technology News | Reuters

 

Softbank-backed Oyo Says Annual Loss Grew Over Six-fold On China Expansion

17 Feb 2020

SoftBank-backed Oyo Hotels and Homes said on Monday losses widened more than six-fold in the year to March 2019, as the India-based hotel chain spent heavily to expand into China.

 

Malaysia To Choose 5g Partners Based On Own Security Standards

17 Feb 2020

Malaysia's own security standards will dictate which companies take part in its planned 5G rollout this year, its communications minister told Reuters on Monday, as the United States pushes countries to exclude China's Huawei.

 

India's Vodafone Idea To Pay 35 Billion Rupees In Telecom Dues This Week, Shares Rise

17 Feb 2020

Beleaguered Indian wireless carrier Vodafone Idea will pay 35 billion rupees ($490 million) in telecoms dues to the federal government by Feb. 21, a lawyer for the company said on Monday.

 

 


 

Technology News | CNET

 

Why You Should Check Out The 2021 Kia Seltos Video     - Roadshow

17 Feb 2020

This new small utility vehicle feels more expensive than it is.

 

2021 Kia Seltos First Drive Review: The Hits Keep Coming     - Roadshow

17 Feb 2020

Kia probably doesn't need another utility vehicle in its lineup, but the new Seltos is good enough that it won't get crowded out by the Soul and Sportage.

 

 


 

Technology News | Wired

 

Over 500 Chrome Extensions Secretly Uploaded Private Data

17 Feb 2020

A researcher discovered that hundreds of extensions in the Web Store were part of a long-running malvertising and ad-fraud scheme.

 

Airbnb Has Devoured London. Here’s The Data To Prove It

17 Feb 2020

The city has four times more listings than it did four years ago, and many of them violate short-term rental limits. 

 

Augmented Reality From The Driver's Seat, And More Car News This Week

17 Feb 2020

Plus: Retailers aim to improve delivery performance, and Airbus displays a model of a new blended-wing plane.

 

 


 

Apple Hot News | Apple

 

Apple Reports Second Quarter Results

27 Apr 2016

Apple today announced financial results for its fiscal 2016 second quarter ended March 26. The company posted quarterly revenue of $50.6 billion and quarterly net income of $10.5 billion, or $1.90 per diluted share. These results compare to revenue of $58 billion and net income of $13.6 billion, or $2.33 per diluted share, in the year-ago quarter. Gross margin was 39.4 percent compared to 40.8 percent in the year-ago quarter. International sales accounted for 67 percent of the quarter’s revenue. “Our team executed extremely well in the face of strong macroeconomic headwinds,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “We are very happy with the continued strong growth in revenue from Services, thanks to the incredible strength of the Apple ecosystem and our growing base of over 1 billion active devices.”

 

Final Cut Pro X Helps Small Company Delight World’s Biggest Clients

21 Apr 2016

When Trim Editing started creating music videos over a decade ago, just paying the rent was a huge accomplishment. Now, the small East London company is crafting award-winning visuals for big brands — like Audi, Nike, Adidas, and Guinness — propelled by the power of Final Cut Pro X. The video editing software’s comprehensive features allow Trim Editing to organize film and audio clips, pull together compelling projects, and make changes on the fly. “When I’m playing back an edit for a director, they’ll say, ‘Okay, let’s go and make those changes I talked about.’ I’ll say, ‘Oh, no, they’re already done,’ and we’ll jump back and watch it again. People can’t believe that I’ve magically done the change before we even finish playback,” says editor Thomas Grove Carter.

 

Apple Introduces 9.7-inch Ipad Pro

22 Mar 2016

Apple today introduced the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, which at just under one pound features a new pro Retina display with greater brightness, wider color gamut, lower reflectivity, Night Shift mode, and new True Tone display technology. The new iPad Pro also has a 64-bit A9X chip that rivals most portable PCs. “iPad Pro is a new generation of iPad that is indispensable and immersive, enabling people to be more productive and more creative. It’s incredibly fast, extremely portable, and completely natural to use with your fingers, Apple Pencil, and Smart Keyboard. And now it comes in two sizes,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing.

 

 


 

Apple News | CNET News

 

Why You Should Check Out The 2021 Kia Seltos Video     - Roadshow

17 Feb 2020

This new small utility vehicle feels more expensive than it is.

 

2021 Kia Seltos First Drive Review: The Hits Keep Coming     - Roadshow

17 Feb 2020

Kia probably doesn't need another utility vehicle in its lineup, but the new Seltos is good enough that it won't get crowded out by the Soul and Sportage.

 

 


 

37 Signals

 

Mailing List Software Should Stop Spying On Subscribers

11 Feb 2020

The internet is finally coming out of its long haze on privacy, but it’s with one hell of a hangover. So many practices that were once taken for granted are now getting a second, more critical look. One of those is the practice of spying on whether recipients of marketing emails open them or not. Back in August, we vowed to stop using such spying pixels in our Basecamp emails . And do you know what? It’s been fine! Not being able to track open rates, and fret over whether that meant our subject lines weren’t providing just the right HOOK, has actually been a relief. But whether these open rates are “useful” or not is irrelevant. They’re invasive, they’re extracted without consent, and they break the basic assumptions most people have about email. There’s a general understanding that if you take actions on the internet, like clicking a link or visiting a site, there’s some tracking associated with that. We might not like it, but at least we have a vague understanding of it. Not so with email spy pixels. Just about every normal person (i.e. someone not working in internet marketing) has been surprised, pissed, or at least dismayed when I tell them about spy pixels in emails. The idea that simply opening an email subjects you to tracking is a completely foreign one to most people. When I’ve raised this concern in conversations with people in the marketing industry, a lot of them have taken offense to the term “spy pixels”. Affixing the spying label made a lot of them uncomfortable, because they were just trying to help  I get that nobody wants to think of themselves as the bad guy (Eilish not withstanding), but using the word “spy” isn’t exactly a reach. Here’s the dictionary definition of a spy: “a person who secretly collects and reports information on the activities, movements, and plans”. That fits pretty well to a spy pixel that tracks whether you open an email or not, without your knowledge or consent! So. Let’s stop doing that. Collectively. And the best place to instigate reform is with the mailing list software we use. A modest proposal for a basic ethics reform: 1) Mailing list software should not have spy pixels turned on by default . This is the most important step, because users will follow the lead of their software. It must be OK to spy on whether people open my marketing emails if the software I’m using it provides that by default. 2) Mailing list software can ask for explicit consent when the sender really does want to track open rates . Let the sender include a disclaimer at the bottom of their email: “[The sender] would like to know when you open this email to help improve their newsletter. If that’s OK with you, [please opt-in to providing read receipts]. Thanks!”. That’s it. Don’t do it by default, ask for informed consent if you must. Being respectful of someone’s privacy isn’t rocket science. And remember, you can still tag your links in those emails with ?source=newsletter or whatever to see whether your call-to-action is working. As we discussed, people have a basic understanding that clicking links and visiting websites – explicit actions they take! – has some tracking involved. This isn’t going to magically make everything better. It’s not going to fix all the issues we have with privacy online or even all the deceptive practices around mailing lists. But it’s going to make things a little better. And if we keep making things a little better, we’ll eventually wake up to a world that’s a lot better.

 

Integrated Systems For Integrated Programmers

01 Feb 2020

One of the great tragedies of modern web development over the last five years or so has been the irrational exuberance for microservices. The idea that making a single great web application had simply become too hard, but if we broke that app up into many smaller apps, it’d all be much easier. Turned out, surprise-surprise, that it mostly wasn’t. As Kelsey Hightower searingly put the fallacy : “We’re gonna break it up and somehow find the engineering discipline we never had in the first place”. But it’s one of those hard lessons that nobody actually wants to hear. You don’t want to hear that the reason your monolith is a spaghetti monster is because you let it become that way, one commit at the time, due to weak habits, pressurized deadlines, or simply sheer lack of competence. No, what you want to hear is that none of that mess is your fault. That it was simply because of the oppressive monolithic architecture. And that, really, you’re just awesome, and if you take your dirty code and stick it into this new microservices tumbler, it’s going to come out sparking clean, smelling like fucking daffodils. The great thing about such delusions is that they can keep you warm for quite a while. A yeah, sure, maybe the complexities of your new microservices monstrosity are plain as day right from the get go, but you can always excuse them with “it’s really going to pay off once we…” bullshit. And it’ll work! For a while. Because, who knows? Maybe this is better? But it’s not. And the day you have to really admit its not, you’re probably not even still there. On to the next thing. Microservices as an architectural gold rush appealed to developers for the same reason TDD appeals to developers: it’s the pseudoscientific promise of a diet . The absolution of a new paradigm to wash away and forgive our sins. Who doesn’t want that? Well, maybe you? Now after you’ve walked through the intellectual desert of a microservice approach to a problem that didn’t remotely warrant it (ie, almost all of them). Maybe now you’re ready to hear a different story. There’s a slot in your brain for a counterargument that just wasn’t there before. So here’s the counterargument: Integrated systems are good. Integrated developers are good. Being able to wrap your mind around the whole application, and have developers who are able to make whole features, is good! The road to madness and despair lays in specialization and compartmentalization. The galaxy brain takes it all in. But of course, you cry, what if the system is too large to fit in my brain? Won’t it just swap and swap until I kernel failure? Yes, if you try to stick in a bloated beast of an application, sure. So the work is to shrink the conceptual surface area of your application until it fits in a normal, but capable and competent, programmer’s brain. Using conceptual compression , sheer good code writing, a productive and succinct environment, using shortcuts and patterns. That’s the work. But the payoff is glorious. Magnificent. SUBLIME. The magic of working on an integrated system together with integrated programmers is a line without limits, arbitrary boundaries, or sully gatekeepers. Forget frontend or backend. The answer is all of it. At the same time. In the same mind. This sounds impossible if you’ve cooked your noodle too long in the stew of modern astronautic abstractions . If you turn down the temperature, you’ll see that the web is actually much the same as it always was. Sure, a few expectations increased here, and a couple of breakthrough techniques appeared there, but fundamentally, it’s the same. What changed was us. And mostly not in ways for the better. If your lived experience still haven’t hit the inevitable wall of defeat on the question of microservices, then be my guest, sit there with your folded arms and your smug pout. It’s ok. I get it. There’s not an open slot for this argument in your brain just yet. It’s ok. I’m patient! I’ll still be here in a couple of years when there’s room. And then I’ll send you a link to this article on twitter. Peace. Love. Integration.

 

Testimony Before The House Antitrust Subcommittee

18 Jan 2020

My name is David Heinemeier Hansson, and I’m the CTO and co-founder of Basecamp, a small internet company from Chicago that sells project-management and team-collaboration software. When we launched our main service back in 2004, the internet provided a largely free, fair, and open marketplace. We could reach customers and provide them with our software without having to ask any technology company for permission or pay them for the privilege. Today, this is practically no longer true. The internet has been colonized by a handful of big tech companies that wield their monopoly power without restraint. This power allow them to bully, extort, or, should they please, even destroy our business – unless we accept their often onerous, exploitive, and ever-changing terms and conditions. These big tech companies control if customers are able to find us online, whether customers can access our software using their mobile devices, and define the questionable ethics of what a competitive marketing campaign must look like. A small company like ours simply has no real agency to reject or resist the rules set by big tech. And neither do consumers. The promise that the internet was going to cut out the middleman has been broken. We’re all left to accept that these companies can and do alter the deal, any deal, however they please. And whenever they do, our only recourse is to pray that they do not alter it any further. Let’s start with Google. Their monopoly in internet search is near total, and their multi-billion dollar bribes to browser makers like Apple ensure no fair competition will ever have a change to emerge. Google uses this monopoly to extort businesses like ours to pay for the privilege that consumers who search for our trademarked brand name can find us. Because if we don’t, they will sell our brand name as misdirection to our competitors. Google feigns interest in recognizing trademark law, by banning the use of trademarked terms in the ad copy, but puts the onus of enforcement on the victims and does nothing to stop repeat offenders. Unless, of course, the trademarked terms are those belonging to Google itself. Then enforcement is swift and automatic. You will not find any competitor ads for Google’s own important properties. Google would never have been able to capture a monopoly in search by acting like this from the start. Misdirecting consumers, blanketing search results with ads, and shaking down small businesses. In the absence of meaningful regulation, they’ll continue to extract absurd monopoly rents, while bribing browser makers to ensure nothing changes. Apple too enjoys the spoils of monopoly pricing power. With the App Store, they own one of the only two mobile application stores that matter (the other belongs to Google!). This cozy duopoly has allowed Apple to keep fees on payment processing for application makers like us exorbitantly high. Whereas a competitive market like that for credit-card processing is only able to sustain around a 2% fee for merchants, Apple, along with Google, has been able to charge an outrageous 30% for years on end. Apple may claim that they do more than payment processing for this fee, such as hosting applications and providing discovery, but the company undercuts this argument by giving these services away for free to application makers who do not charge for their apps. But worse still is the draconian restrictions and merciless retribution that Apple brings to bear on application makers who dare to decline using Apple payment services. Even a mere link to an external webpage, that explains how to sign up for a service that doesn’t use Apple’s payment system, can get your application rejected. Every application maker using the Apple’s App Store live in fear that their next update is denied or even that their application removed. All it takes is being assigned the wrong review clerk who chooses to interpret the often vague and confusing rules different than the last. Then you’ll be stuck in an appeals process that would make Kafka blush. Finally, Facebook’s industrial-scale vacuuming of the everyone’s personal data has created an ad-targeting machine so devastatingly effective, that the company, together with – guess who! – Google, is currently capturing virtually all growth in internet advertisement. I quote a report in my written testimony that put that capture, between Facebook and Google, at 99% in 2016. Not even Putin would dare brag of an approval rating that high! Facebook is able to maintain this iron grip on the collection of personal data by continuing to buy any promising competitor. The acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp should never have been approved by regulators, and need to be urgently undone. This creates a marketplace where companies that wish not to partake in the wholesale violation of consumer privacy is at a grave disadvantage. If you chose not to take advantage of this terrifying and devastatingly effective ad machine, your competitors surely will. This has been but a brief taste of what it’s like to live as a small tech company in a digital world owned and operated by big tech. And I didn’t even touch on the misery that is to attempt direct, head-on competition with any of these conglomerates. But at some point, all businesses will be competing against big tech, simply because big tech is bent on expanding until it does absolutely everything! The aforementioned companies already do payment processing, credit card issueing, music distribution, TV producing, advertising networks, map making, navigation services, alarm systems, cameras, computers, medical devices, and about a billion other things. Help us, congress. You’re our only hope. This testimony was delivered before the House Antitrust Subcommitee’s hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in Part 5: Competitors in the Digital Economy on January 17th, 2020. Expanded Written Testimony Submitted to the House Antitrust Subcommittee Download

 

 

 

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