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This is our page - our page to let you know what we dig, what we think is fun, awesome or just flat out WICKED  Plus, we have some feeds coming in from some of our favourite technology sources...so geek up folks!

 

100 GREAT Things About America | Happy 4th USA

 

It's time for a breather, America. Fire up the grill, ice down the drinks, and pop open that patio umbrella. Health care, the oil spill, Afghanistan, China, Elena Kagan and financial reform will all be waiting on Tuesday, July 6th. We promise. What won't be, though, is the chance to lean back and remember why we care enough about our country to spar over these things and in the end, remain united.

 

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Superyacht transforms into 'pleasure submarine''

 

From inside it looks like a swanky bachelor pad, kitted out with an abnormally large aquarium. But, this is no fashionable New York apartment, rather the latest in sub-aquatic luxury -- a cruise yacht that doubles up as a submarine.

 

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Technology News | Reuters

 

Equifax To Pay $700 Million Over 2017 Data Breach, Compensate Consumers

23 Jul 2019

Credit-reporting company Equifax Inc will pay up to $700 million to settle U.S. federal and state probes into a massive 2017 data breach of personal information that affected around 147 million consumers, authorities said on Monday.

 

Toshiba Memory Sees 'good Chance' Of M&a In Push For Data Center Business

23 Jul 2019

Japan's Toshiba Memory said there was a "good chance" of acquisitions as it pushes to increase its share of the market for advanced storage products used in data centers.

 

Microsoft To Invest $1 Billion In Openai

23 Jul 2019

Microsoft Corp said on Monday it was investing $1 billion in San Francisco-based OpenAI and that the two had formed a multi-year partnership to develop artificial intelligence supercomputing technologies on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing service.

 

 


 

Technology News | CNET

 

Microsoft Invests $1 Billion In Openai For Supercomputing Tech     - Cnet

23 Jul 2019

OpenAI will develop AI supercomputing technologies on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing service.

 

The Airpods With Wireless Charging Case Are Back At Their Prime Day Price     - Cnet

23 Jul 2019

For a limited time, save $30 on Apple's top-tier true-wireless earbuds.

 

This Rss App Can Marie-kondo Your News Clutter And Get You Off Facebook     - Cnet

23 Jul 2019

If you're feeling media burnout from overfed social feeds, Inoreader is a news aggregator that still sparks joy.

 

 


 

Technology News | Wired

 

Pinterest's New Search Tool Puts Stress Relief In Your Feed

23 Jul 2019

Soon the company will begin placing anxiety-relieving exercises within its search results to help boost your mood.

 

Zero Breeze Mark Ii Portable Air Conditioner Review: A Noisy But Effective Way To Chill Out

23 Jul 2019

The Zero Breeze Mark II is a battery-powered solution for staying comfortable on sweltering camping trips.

 

Robert Mueller's Testimony: What Congress Needs To Know

22 Jul 2019

Here’s what members of Congress should know before they question the former special counsel.

 

 


 

Apple Hot News | Apple

 

Apple Reports Second Quarter Results

27 Apr 2016

Apple today announced financial results for its fiscal 2016 second quarter ended March 26. The company posted quarterly revenue of $50.6 billion and quarterly net income of $10.5 billion, or $1.90 per diluted share. These results compare to revenue of $58 billion and net income of $13.6 billion, or $2.33 per diluted share, in the year-ago quarter. Gross margin was 39.4 percent compared to 40.8 percent in the year-ago quarter. International sales accounted for 67 percent of the quarter’s revenue. “Our team executed extremely well in the face of strong macroeconomic headwinds,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “We are very happy with the continued strong growth in revenue from Services, thanks to the incredible strength of the Apple ecosystem and our growing base of over 1 billion active devices.”

 

Final Cut Pro X Helps Small Company Delight World’s Biggest Clients

21 Apr 2016

When Trim Editing started creating music videos over a decade ago, just paying the rent was a huge accomplishment. Now, the small East London company is crafting award-winning visuals for big brands — like Audi, Nike, Adidas, and Guinness — propelled by the power of Final Cut Pro X. The video editing software’s comprehensive features allow Trim Editing to organize film and audio clips, pull together compelling projects, and make changes on the fly. “When I’m playing back an edit for a director, they’ll say, ‘Okay, let’s go and make those changes I talked about.’ I’ll say, ‘Oh, no, they’re already done,’ and we’ll jump back and watch it again. People can’t believe that I’ve magically done the change before we even finish playback,” says editor Thomas Grove Carter.

 

Apple Introduces 9.7-inch Ipad Pro

22 Mar 2016

Apple today introduced the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, which at just under one pound features a new pro Retina display with greater brightness, wider color gamut, lower reflectivity, Night Shift mode, and new True Tone display technology. The new iPad Pro also has a 64-bit A9X chip that rivals most portable PCs. “iPad Pro is a new generation of iPad that is indispensable and immersive, enabling people to be more productive and more creative. It’s incredibly fast, extremely portable, and completely natural to use with your fingers, Apple Pencil, and Smart Keyboard. And now it comes in two sizes,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing.

 

 


 

Apple News | CNET News

 

Microsoft Invests $1 Billion In Openai For Supercomputing Tech     - Cnet

23 Jul 2019

OpenAI will develop AI supercomputing technologies on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing service.

 

The Airpods With Wireless Charging Case Are Back At Their Prime Day Price     - Cnet

23 Jul 2019

For a limited time, save $30 on Apple's top-tier true-wireless earbuds.

 

This Rss App Can Marie-kondo Your News Clutter And Get You Off Facebook     - Cnet

23 Jul 2019

If you're feeling media burnout from overfed social feeds, Inoreader is a news aggregator that still sparks joy.

 

 


 

37 Signals

 

What Great Managers Do: Prune

23 Jul 2019

Being a great manager and English gardening have more in common than you might imagine. If you want to improve your leadership skills, there no shortage of analogies that have been made about great managers. A great manager is a “coach,” a “captain of a ship,” or even a “human shield.” However, I heard a more unlikely comparison about leadership made on our podcast,  The Heartbeat , when I  interviewed   David Cancel , CEO of Drift. He told me: “I kind of think about most of this stuff as English gardening. If you want an English garden most of the work is actually the pruning and the taking care of. It’s not the planting, it’s not the plant selection. It’s this constant pruning. The day that you stop pruning is the day that the garden is full of weeds and overrun.” I found this to be a brilliant analogy on several levels. First of all, pruning is a small, seemingly minor activity. You’re not making big, sweeping moves of planting new shrubs or replanting a whole tree. This is also true of good leadership. We often believe great managers must take broad, bold actions. Strong decisions, rousing speeches, uncharted direction. But that’s not really what leadership is. It’s is not lavish, nor massive. It’s small, incremental action that engenders real progress in the long run. True leadership is genuinely saying “thank you” when a team member does a favor for you, or asking “How could’ve our last one-on-one meeting been better?” before you meet with a direct report. Second, when you prune, you clip away the dead leaves or diseased areas of a garden to encourage healthy growth. A great manager does this, as well. They focus on removing frustrating blockers for their team – be it changing an unrealistic deadline, or deciding to fire a rude customer. They figure out what parts of the team are in decay or lacking in resources. Great managers focus on paring back, and then getting out of their team’s way. Pruning is also done  periodically , only when the season is fitting. If you prune all the time and you can accidentally over prune a plant and deprive it of nutrients. Leadership is similar. Harvard Business Review published  research  revealed on how managers who are “constantly coaching” overwhelm their team and exhaust them. After studying 7,300 managers, they discovered “employees coached by Always-on Managers performed worse than those coached by the other types.” Constant coaching, like constant pruning, is a bad thing. However, at the same time, fail to prune  consistently  over time, and, as David mentioned, your entire garden will be overrun. Weeds sprouting, stems rotting. As a manager, you must be mindful of this. You can’t expect that a single one-on-one meeting with your direct report, once a year, will be sufficient for understanding their thoughts on what could be better about the team. A regular, steady cadence of communication –  especially for one-on-one meetings  – is critical if you’re to feel connected to your team as a leader. In both leadership and English gardening, “one and done” doesn’t work. Thank you, David, for making this analogy. Who knew pruning English gardens could be a source of inspiration for us as leaders. Claire  is the CEO of  Know Your Team  – software that helps you avoid becoming a bad boss. Her company was spun-out of Basecamp back in 2014. If you were interested, you can read more of Claire’s writing on leadership on the Know Your Team  blog .

 

Hire When It Hurts

17 Jul 2019

You may have noticed that Basecamp is in the midst of what qualifies around here as a mini hiring boom: five open positions across customer support, programming, and ops, as well as a newly created marketing role. The company has received more than 4,000 applications and every single one is read by a human being. In the latest episode of the Rework podcast , hear about why Basecamp briefly lifted its hiring freeze, how job ads are written, and what the process is for evaluating candidates.

 

Am I Micromanaging My Team?

16 Jul 2019

Here are the 5 most telling signs of micromanagement – and what you can do instead. I won’t tell anyone:  You think you might be a micromanager. Argh. If there were scarlet letters for a bad manager to wear, “m-i-c-r-o-m-a-n-a-g-e-r” would be among them. But, how do you know if you’re a micromanager, for sure?  Yes, you can directly ask your team members if they think you’re micromanaging them. If you have a direct report who has a penchant for shooting you straight, I highly recommend this. (In fact, when we asked through  Know Your Team  to 606 employees across 61 companies, “Do you feel micromanaged?” 12% said “Yes.”) But it’s also probable that your direct report might not concede the truth. You are their boss, after all. And telling a boss they’re a micromanager is the equivalent of, well, slapping them in the face. 🙂 Given that your team member does not want to slap you in the face… you can sort of do it yourself  What I mean by this is that you can consider the behaviors most often exhibited by micromanagers, and honestly reflect: Do I do this? From the research and insights we’ve gathered through  Know Your Team  and the interviews I’ve done with leaders on our  podcast , here are the 5 most-telling signs that your answer to “Am I micromanaging my team?” is “Drat, yes.” Sign #1:  You have a habit of asking, “Just checking in on this?” before a project is due. The clock is ticking and you haven’t heard on how a project is coming along. Is it on time? Is it going well? So, you do what feels only natural:  You ask, “How’s it going?” or “What’s the latest?” or “Just checking in on this?” While seemingly harmless to you – and rather important to you that you have an answer – it’s death by a thousand paper cuts for your direct reports. You’re not giving them a chance to prove to you that it’s going well. You’re literally intruding and asking for a status update to appease your own anxiety about progress. Instead, make it clear  upfront  how you’d like progress to be communicated to you, instead of popping in and asking, “Just checking in on this?” on your own whim and schedule. Sign #2:  You find yourself saying, “Here’s how I would do it,” before they ask, “How would you do it?” You want to be helpful. You’ve done the thing a million times yourself. You know the tricks, the nooks, the crannies… Wouldn’t your team want to know your opinion? They might. But when you assert your opinion before they ask for it, you can obligate a team member to do something  your  way. No one wants to offend their boss by not following their advice. It can feel constricting – not to mention distracting – to have suggestions heaped on them before they’ve even had an opportunity to wrestle with the problem themselves. Rather, try waiting for your direct report to ask, “How would you approach this?” instead of offering your advice immediately.  Sign #3:  You mentally log what time someone arrives or leaves the office (or appears online or offline). When you’ve got a crucial project on the line, it’s tempting to know that your team will produce the results you’re looking for. And, it’s easy to correlate the likelihood of an outcome with the number of hours spent in the office or online. However, that’s not how it works. The quality of results have nothing to do with the amount of time spent at the office or online. Remind yourself:  What you care about are the results. So any energy you spend – even if it’s 30 seconds – gaging how often someone’s green “online” dot is ever-present in Slack is wasted energy. You’re only building up more frantic, unproductive energy within yourself. Sign #4:  You say, “I can just do it…” or “Let me just do it…” A problem appears. A team member comes to you, asking for your help. Or perhaps it’s a mistake or issue you notice on your own accord. Someone has to fix it – so who better than you? You roll up your sleeves and get to work. This is the right move… right? Not quite. In my  podcast  interview with Wade Foster, CEO of  Zapier , he shared how solving  problems  as a manager is a big sign you’re not doing your job well as a manager. When you’re the one saying “I can just do it” or “Let me just do it” you don’t give your team a chance to do it. Your team never learns, and thus, they can never get better. You stifle your team, and unknowingly to you, are micromanaging them. Sign #5:  You ask: Can you “cc” me on that? You want to be in the loop. You need context to do your job well as a manager. As a result, you ask “Can you ‘cc’ me on that?” While appropriate in some cases, your reliance on this phrase can also reveal how much space you’re giving your team to do their best work. Are you asking to be cc-ed on things you don’t truly need to copied on? Is it “just in case,” to quell your own uncertainty? Consider that the more you use this phrase – and the greater triviality of the message you’re asking to be cc-ed on – the more you’re trying to micromanage your team. If one (or all) of these signs of micromanagement had you nodding begrudgingly – it’s okay. You don’t need to castigate yourself or hide in shame. There are some small, practical things you can do to avoid becoming a micromanager. Instead of defaulting controlling tendencies, here are some questions you can ask to avoid micromanaging: How should we define success? Is the definition of success clear? What do you need from me to be successful? What’s the best way to share progress about this project? When would you prefer I check-in, if at all? When is it most helpful for you to loop me in? How much context would you like upfront before I hand-off a project or a task? What are you most worried about getting “wrong” with the project? Do you like new ideas and suggestions for ways to do things? Or do you prefer to be heads-down a bit before I interject and offer suggestions? What’s the best way to define if something is “done” or high quality? These questions give choice in how someone can do their work, instead of imposing your own way of working on them.  You can also use certain phrases to clarify expectations – without micromanaging your team. Here are a handful to try: If I have a tendency to do X please call me out on it. You don’t need to ask for my permission about Y. You don’t need to cc me about Z. You don’t need to tell me about A. I would prefer that you tell me about B, ask for permission about C, and cc me about D. This is just my advice, take it or leave it. You do not have to do E the way that I did it. This is your decision to make. While micromanaging your team can seem like the gravest of leadership sins, it is not unredeemable. The first – and perhaps most important – step is that you’re here, in the confessional booth, already. Now it’s up to you to act differently. You don’t have to be a micromanager if you don’t want to be. Claire  is the CEO of  Know Your Team  – software that helps you avoid becoming a bad boss. Her company was spun-out of Basecamp back in 2014. If you were interested, you can read more of Claire’s writing on leadership on the Know Your Team  blog .

 

 

 

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